Breaking Radio Silence

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Sorry I haven’t written in a few days. I just haven’t had it in me. And with that, here goes a stream-of-consciousness barrage of words from the last little while.

Thursday morning, I learned a friend of mine who had been diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer had passed away. I didn’t feel much like doing the truly optional parts of my checklist, and I was particularly sad because of the news, so I didn’t choose to write about it, though I should have.

By the time I’d recovered enough to start my day, it was time to make preparations for my radio show, which this time included something special.

The radio station that I deejay for was founded as a support community for one particular server on a superhero MMORPG called City of Heroes. We started playing the game to stay in touch with my wife’s best friend and eventually we joined the radio station community and, later, became DJs ourselves. I also found my most recent job through the contacts that I made at the station, so I’ve gotten a good deal of life experience out of that relationship.

The game itself shut down in late 2012 and the station went on to support two more games, later dropping one and picking up two more, and eventually becoming “game-agnostic,” meaning that the station doesn’t officially support one game over another – as long as the game has a social component, there’s a possibility that the station could have a show in the game. (In-game shows basically consist of character avatars gathering in one place and roleplaying a dance party, with game-related conversation going on amongst the participants and the DJs keeping the conversation going if and when there’s a lull.)

Our original game, City of Heroes, has a fiercely loyal fanbase. Many players that I know through the station have vowed never to give the game’s distribution company another dime on any future game, and many have never let go of the dream that one day, City would reopen.

Recently, it was announced that a third party had acquired enough of the game code to reopen the game environment of City of Heroes as an XMPP chat server. Roleplay could happen, but powers, even those designed solely for travel, weren’t present. Neither were enemies or NPCs (non-player characters, like mission contacts or random people on the street, for instance). But enough of the game environment was present to recreate a station show in our original format. The new product is called Paragon Chat, a take on the “City” portion of City of Heroes (heroes were all based in a fictional city called Paragon City).

Paragon Chat went live on Tuesday evening, and so I spent part of my Thursday setting up the chat client and preparing my avatar for hosting my show in the game’s nightclub, where the station hosted many of their shows.

The show itself was awash with nostalgia. Characters who haven’t seen one another for years were getting reacquainted, players were still trying to figure out what worked and what didn’t. (The chat client’s functionality is being improved slowly over what appears to be a planned timetable, so while some costume pieces and game commands may not be available now, they could be in the future.) I had done special shows in conjunction with in-game events in between City’s sunset and Paragon Chat’s introduction in the other games that we supported, and the most I ever got at one show was seven players and maybe 30 listeners to the station’s livestream. Thursday night at one point I had 24 players at the show, and peaked at 45 listeners. It seemed our community was happy to come home, or as close to home as we could get.

At around 7:30 pm, or roughly halfway through my show, I checked my blood pressure, and it was significantly elevated, so I kept an eye on it every few minutes or so. At one point, it topped out at 200/118. I was determined to finish my show, and besides, my wife was at work and would be until 11:00 pm, so I stuck it out, keeping a careful eye on things and promising both my wife and the DJ that followed my show that I’d call 911 if things got as bad as that 200/118 reading again. (The DJ that takes over from me is local, which is a rare occurrence for our station. Our DJs broadcast from all over the United States, as well as Canada and Australia, so finding multiple DJs in one metropolitan area is rare. The only two cities that we have multiple DJs that aren’t romantically involved with one another are Austin and Chicago. I brought this up because my follow-up DJ was prepared to put the show on autopilot and drive me to the ER herself.) I made it through the show and when my wife got home, we went off to the ER again, for the second time in two days. Once again, I got a Clonidine and was discharged without much fanfare.

Friday morning I saw my doctor for my annual physical and to pick up the results of the bloodwork. And that’s where things get really cool.

A1C is a measurement of blood glucose over the previous three months. A normal A1C for someone without diabetes ranges from 4 to 6, with prediabetes diagnosed for anyone ranging from 5.7 to 6.4. An A1C reading of 6.5 or higher over two tests is indicative of diabetes. My most recent A1C (when I was diagnosed) was 10.4, well into the range of uncontrolled diabetes. The lab that took my reading considers a normal range to be 4.0 to 5.6.

My A1C was 5.7. But the news got better.

A person is considered to have high cholesterol if their reading is over 200. Mine has historically been anywhere from 230-250. Triglycerides should be under 150. My highest reading has been over 900. HDL cholesterol (the good kind) should be above 39, and LDL cholesterol (the bad kind) should be below 100. Usually my HDL reading has been between 25 and 28, and my LDL has been over 150 at one point.

My cholesterol was 128. Triglycerides were 288, still not within normal range, but far better than they’ve ever been as long as I’ve been checking them. HDL was 33, still not normal, but headed in the right direction. My LDL was 37.

And to top everything off, I’d lost 16 pounds in six weeks.

So I rewarded myself yesterday with a day of not bothering with the checklist at all and just doing whatever was going to make me happy. And I still didn’t feel like writing, so I didn’t.

So that basically catches you up on the last couple of days. It’s been an emotional roller coaster, but with far more good than bad. I just wanted to savor it in the moment, knowing I could report in with the good news when I got around to it.

And I just got around to it. How’ve you been?

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